Waste Water Treatment

- Sewage Treatment Plant
-
Grey Water Treatment
- Decentralised STP
- Containerized STP
- Skid Mounted STP
- STP for labor camp
-
Compact STP

- Sustainable STP
- STP for weekend home
- Tertiary Treatment with Ozonation

 Water Treatment Solutions

- Drinking Water Treatment
- Swimming Pool/Ponds
- Process Water Treatment
- Type II RO Water
- Laundry Water Treatment
- Cooling Tower Treatment
- Municipal Drinking Water
- Sea Water Desalination
- River/Lake/Dam Ground

 Air Treatment Solutions

- Operation Room Fumigation
- Odor removal / Control
- Indoor Air Treatment
- Indoor Air Quality (IAQ)
- HVAC / AHU Ozonation
- Air Disinfection
- VOC Reduction
- Sick Building Syndrome
- Production Industry
- Packing Industry

 

Sick Building Syndrome

The term "sick building syndrome" (SBS) is used to describe situations in which building occupants experience acute health and comfort effects that appear to be linked to time spent in a building, but no specific illness or cause can be identified. The complaints may be localized in a particular room or zone, or may be widespread throughout the building.

A 1984 World Health Organization Committee report suggested that up to 30 percent of new and remodeled buildings worldwide may be the subject of excessive complaints related to indoor air quality (IAQ). Often this condition is temporary, but some buildings have long-term problems.

Sometimes indoor air problems are a result of poor building design and maintenance or occupant activities.
 

• Building occupants complain of symptoms associated with acute discomfort, e.g., headache; eye, nose, or throat irritation;  dry cough; dry or itchy skin; dizziness and nausea; difficulty in concentrating; fatigue; and sensitivity to odors.
• The cause of the symptoms is not known.
• Most of the complainants report relief soon after leaving the building.
• Building occupants complain of symptoms such as cough; chest tightness; fever, chills; and muscle aches
 

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Green Building
LEED
Indoor Air Quality Solutions
Sustainable Building
Sick Building Syndrome (SBS)



Contact Us
Project Office Address :

28, Satyam Industrial Estate, Subhash Road, Jogeshwari (East) Mumbai 400 060 INDIA

Causes of Sick Building Syndrome
The following have been cited causes of or contributing factors to sick building syndrome:

Inadequate ventilation:
In the early and mid 1900's, building ventilation standards called for approximately 15 cubic feet per minute (cfm) of outside air for each building occupant, primarily to dilute and remove body odors. As a result of the 1973 oil embargo, however, national energy conservation measures called for a reduction in the amount of outdoor air provided for ventilation to 5 cfm per occupant. In many cases these reduced outdoor air ventilation rates were found to be inadequate to maintain the health and comfort of building occupants.

Achieve acceptable Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) while minimizing energy consumption, the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) recently revised its ventilation standard to provide a minimum of 15 cfm of outdoor air per person (20 cfm / person in office spaces). Up to 60 cfm/person may be required in some spaces (such as Food court & pantry area, gaming zone, meeting & convention centres, smoking lounges) depending on the activities that normally occur in that space (As per ASHRAE Standard 62-1989).

Chemical contaminants from indoor sources:
Most indoor air pollution comes from sources inside the building. For example, adhesives, carpeting, upholstery, manufactured wood products, copy machines, pesticides, and cleaning agents may emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including formaldehyde. Combustion products such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, as well as respirable particles, can come from unvented kerosene and gas space heaters, woodstoves, fireplaces and gas stoves.

Research shows that some VOCs can cause chronic and acute health effects at high concentrations, and some are known carcinogens.

Chemical contaminants from outdoor sources:
The outdoor air that enters a building can be a source of indoor air pollution. For example, pollutants from motor vehicle exhausts; plumbing vents, and building exhausts (e.g., bathrooms and kitchens) can enter the building through poorly located air intake vents, windows, and other openings. In addition, combustion products can enter a building from a nearby garage.

Biological contaminants:
Bacteria, molds, pollen, and viruses are types of biological contaminants. These contaminants may breed in stagnant water that has accumulated in ducts, humidifiers and drain pans, or here water has collected on ceiling tiles, carpeting, or insulation. Sometimes insects or bird droppings can be a source of biological contaminants.

Physical symptoms related to biological contamination include cough, chest tightness, fever, chills, muscle aches, and allergic responses such as mucous membrane irritation and upper respiratory congestion. One indoor bacterium, Legionella, has caused both Legionnaire's Disease and Pontiac Fever.

Solutions to Sick Building Syndrome
Solutions to sick building syndrome usually include combinations of the following:

1. Pollutant source removal or modification is an effective approach to improve the Indoor Air Quality.

2. Increasing ventilation rates and air distribution can be a cost effective means of reducing indoor pollutant levels. HVAC systems should be designed, at a minimum, to meet ventilation standards in local building codes. In many buildings, IAQ can be improved by operating the HVAC system to at least its design standard, and to ASHRAE Standard 62-1989.

3. Air cleaning can be a useful adjunct to source control and ventilation.

4. Education and communication are important elements in both remedial and preventive indoor air quality management programs. When building occupants, management, and maintenance personnel fully communicate and understand the causes and consequences of IAQ problems, they can work more effectively together to prevent problems from occurring, or to solve them if they do.


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